beijing meidi psoriasis hospital

Psoriasis is a long-lasting autoimmune disease characterized by patches of abnormal skin.

These skin patches are typically red, itchy, and scaly. They may vary in severity from small and localized to complete body coverage.

It typically affects the outside of the elbows, knees or scalp, though it can appear on any location. Some people report that psoriasis is itchy, burns and stings. Psoriasis is associated with other serious health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease and depression.

If you develop a rash that doesn't go away with an over-the-counter medication, you should consider contacting your doctor.

How do I get psoriasis?

While scientists do not know what exactly causes psoriasis, we do know that the immune system and genetics play major roles in its development. Usually, something triggers psoriasis to flare. The skin cells in people with psoriasis grow at an abnormally fast rate, which causes the buildup of psoriasis lesions.

Men and women develop psoriasis at equal rates. Psoriasis also occurs in all racial groups, but at varying rates. About 1.9 percent of African-Americans have psoriasis, compared to 3.6 percent of Caucasians.

Psoriasis often develops between the ages of 15 and 35, but it can develop at any age. About 10 to 15 percent of those with psoriasis get it before age 10. Some infants have psoriasis, although this is considered rare.

Psoriasis is not contagious. It is not something you can "catch" or that others can catch from you. Psoriasis lesions are not infectious.

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What Causes Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a skin disorder driven by the immune system, especially involving a type of white blood cell called a T cell. Normally, T cells help protect the body against infection and disease. In the case of psoriasis, T cells are put into action by mistake and become so active that they trigger other immune responses, which lead to inflammation and to rapid turnover of skin cells.

In many cases, there is a family history of psoriasis. Researchers have studied a large number of families affected by psoriasis and identified genes linked to the disease. Genes govern every bodily function and determine the inherited traits passed from parent to child.

People with psoriasis may notice that there are times when their skin worsens, called flares, then improves. Conditions that may cause flares include infections, stress, and changes in climate that dry the skin. Also, certain medicines, including beta-blockers, which are prescribed for high blood pressure, and lithium may trigger an outbreak or worsen the disease. Sometimes people who have psoriasis notice that lesions will appear where the skin has experienced trauma. The trauma could be from a cut, scratch, sunburn, or infection.

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What Symptoms Psoriasis?

Getting familiar with your psoriasis symptoms will help you be prepared for a conversation with your doctor.

Common Symptoms of Psoriasis

Not everyone with psoriasis experiences the same symptoms, which can vary from person to person based on the severity and type of psoriasis. However, common symptoms may include:

  • Raised, red, inflamed lesions
  • Silvery scaly plaques
  • Small, red, individual spots (more common in children and young adults)
  • Dry skin that may crack and bleed
  • Itching, burning, or soreness of the skin
  • Pitted nails or separation from the nail bed
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How Is Psoriasis Diagnosed?

Occasionally, doctors may find it difficult to diagnose psoriasis, because it often looks like other skin diseases. It may be necessary to confirm a diagnosis by examining a small skin sample under a microscope.

There are several forms of psoriasis. Some of these include:

  • Plaque psoriasis. Skin lesions are red at the base and covered by silvery scales. Guttate psoriasis. Small, drop-shaped lesions appear on the trunk, limbs, and scalp. Guttate psoriasis is most often triggered by upper respiratory infections (for example, a sore throat caused by streptococcal bacteria).
  • Pustular psoriasis.Blisters of noninfectious pus appear on the skin. Attacks of pustular psoriasis may be triggered by medications, infections, stress, or exposure to certain chemicals.
  • Inverse psoriasis. Smooth, red patches occur in the folds of the skin near the genitals, under the breasts, or in the armpits. The symptoms may be worsened by friction and sweating.
  • Erythrodermic psoriasis. Widespread reddening and scaling of the skin may be a reaction to severe sunburn or to taking corticosteroids (cortisone) or other medications. It can also be caused by a prolonged period of increased activity of psoriasis that is poorly controlled. Erythrodermic psoriasis can be very serious and requires immediate medical attention.

Another condition in which people may experience psoriasis is psoriatic arthritis. This is a form of arthritis that produces the joint inflammation common in arthritis and the lesions common in psoriasis. The joint inflammation and the skin lesions don't necessarily have to occur at the same time.

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Is psoriasis contagious?

No. Research studies have not shown it to be contagious from person to person. A person cannot catch it from someone else, and one cannot pass it to anyone else by skin-to-skin contact. Directly touching someone with psoriasis every day will never transmit the condition.

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Is psoriasis hereditary?

Although psoriasis is not contagious from person to person, there is a known hereditary tendency. Therefore, family history is very helpful in making the diagnosis.

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How many people have psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a fairly common skin condition and is estimated to affect approximately 1%-3% of the U.S. population. It currently affects roughly 7.5 million to 8.5 million people in the U.S. It is seen worldwide in about 125 million people. Interestingly, African Americans have about half the rate of psoriasis as Caucasians.

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Where does psoriasis show up?

Psoriasis can show up anywhere—on the eyelids, ears, mouth and lips, skin folds, hands and feet, and nails. The skin at each of these sites is different and requires different treatments.

Light therapy or topical treatments are often used when psoriasis is limited to a specific part of the body. However, doctors may prescribe oral or injectable drugs if the psoriasis is widespread or greatly affects your quality of life. Effective treatments are available, no matter where your psoriasis is located.

body of psoriasis

Scalp Psoriasis

Scalp psoriasis can be very mild, with slight, fine scaling. It can also be very severe with thick, crusted plaques covering the entire scalp. Psoriasis can extend beyond the hairline onto the forehead, the back of the neck and around the ears.

Face

Facial psoriasis most often affects the eyebrows, the skin between the nose and upper lip, the upper forehead and the hairline. Psoriasis on and around the face should be treated carefully because the skin here is sensitive.

Hands, Feet and Nails

Treat sudden flares of psoriasis on the hands and feet promptly and carefully. In some cases, cracking, blisters and swelling accompany flares. Nail changes occur in up to 50 percent of people with psoriasis and at least 80 percent of people with psoriatic arthritis.

Genital Psoriasis

The most common type of psoriasis in the genital region is inverse psoriasis, but other forms of psoriasis can appear on the genitals, especially in men. Genital psoriasis requires careful treatment and care.

Skin Folds

nverse psoriasis can occur in skin folds such as the armpits and under the breasts. This form of psoriasis is frequently irritated by rubbing and sweating.

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How severe is my psoriasis?

Psoriasis can be mild, moderate or severe. Your treatment options may depend on how severe your psoriasis is. Severity is based on how much of your body is affected by psoriasis. (The surface area of the hand equals about 1 percent of the skin.) However, the severity of psoriasis is also measured by how psoriasis affects a person's quality of life. For example, psoriasis can have a serious impact on one's daily activities even if it involves a small area, such as the palms of the hands or soles of the feet.

MILD

Mild psoriasis covers less than 3 percent of the
body.

MODERATE

Moderate psoriasis covers between 3 and 10 percent of the body.

SEVERE

If psoriasis covers more than 10 percent of your body, it is severe.

Topical treatments, such as moisturizers, over-the-counter and prescriptions creams and shampoos, typically are used for mild psoriasis.

Treating moderate to severe psoriasis usually involves a combination of treatment strategies. Besides topical treatments, your doctor your doctor may prescribe phototherapy (also known as light therapy). Your doctor may also prescribe systemic medications, including biologic drugs, especially if your psoriasis is significantly impacting your quality of life.

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How Is Psoriasis Treated?

There are many effective treatment choices for psoriasis. Doctors generally treat psoriasis in steps based on the severity of the disease, size of the areas involved, type of psoriasis, where the psoriasis is located, and the patient's response to initial treatments.

Topical Treatment

Treatments applied directly to the skin may improve its condition. Doctors find that some patients respond well to ointment or cream forms of corticosteroids, vitamin D3, retinoids, coal tar, or anthralin. Bath solutions and lubricants may be soothing, but they are seldom strong enough to improve the condition of the skin. Therefore, they usually are combined with stronger remedies.

  • Topical corticosteroids. These drugs reduce inflammation and the turnover of skin cells, and they suppress the immune system. Corticosteroids are typically recommended for active outbreaks of psoriasis. Long-term use or overuse of highly potent (strong) corticosteroids can cause thinning of the skin, internal side effects, and resistance to the treatment's benefits.
  • Vitamin D analogs. Synthetic forms of vitamin D control the speed of turnover of skin cells. Excessive use of these creams may raise the amount of calcium in the body to unhealthy levels.
  • Retinoids. Topical retinoids are synthetic forms of vitamin A. Because of the risk of birth defects, women of childbearing age must take measures to prevent pregnancy when using retinoids.
  • Coal tar. Preparations containing coal tar (gels and ointments) may be applied directly to the skin, added (as a liquid) to the bath, or used on the scalp as a shampoo. Coal tar products are available in different strengths, and many are sold over the counter (not requiring a prescription). The most potent form of coal tar may irritate the skin, is messy, has a strong odor, and may stain the skin or clothing.
  • Anthralin. Anthralin reduces the increase in skin cells and inflammation. Doctors may prescribe daily application of anthralin ointment, cream, or paste for brief periods to treat chronic psoriasis lesions. Afterward, anthralin must be washed off the skin to prevent irritation. It discolors skin, bathtub, sink, clothing, and most surfaces.
  • Salicylic acid. This peeling agent, which is available in many forms such as ointments, creams, gels, and shampoos, can be applied to reduce scaling of the skin or scalp.
  • Bath solutions. People with psoriasis may find that adding oil when bathing, then applying a lubricant, soothes their skin. Also, individuals can remove scales and reduce itching by soaking in water containing a coal tar solution, oiled oatmeal, Epsom salts, or Dead Sea salts.
  • Lubricants. When applied regularly over a long period, lubricants have a soothing effect. Preparations that are thick and greasy usually work best because they seal water in the skin, reducing scaling and itching.

Light Therapy

Natural ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun and controlled delivery of artificial UV light are used in treating psoriasis. It is important that light therapy be administered by a doctor. Spending time in the sun or a tanning bed can cause skin damage, increase the risk of skin cancer, and worsen symptoms.

  • Sunlight. Much of sunlight is composed of bands of different wavelengths of UV light. When absorbed into the skin, UV light suppresses the process Fleading to disease, causing activated T cells in the skin to die. This process reduces inflammation and slows the turnover of skin cells that causes scaling.
  • Ultraviolet B (UVB) phototherapy. UVB is light with a short wavelength that is absorbed in the skin's epidermis. An artificial source can be used to treat mild and moderate psoriasis. Some physicians will start treating patients with UVB instead of topical agents. A UVB phototherapy, called broadband UVB, can be used for a few small lesions, to treat widespread psoriasis, or for lesions that resist topical treatment. This type of phototherapy is normally given in a doctor's office by using a light panel or light box. Some patients use UVB light boxes at home under a doctor's guidance.
  • Another type of UVB, called narrowband UVB, emits the part of the UV light spectrum band that is most helpful for psoriasis. Narrowband UVB treatment is superior to broadband UVB, but it is less effective than PUVA treatment (see next paragraph). At first, patients may require several treatments of narrowband UVB spaced close together to improve their skin. Once the skin has shown improvement, a maintenance treatment may be all that is necessary. However, narrowband UVB treatment is not without risk. It can cause more severe and longer lasting burns than broadband treatment.

  • Psoralen and ultraviolet A (UVA) phototherapy (PUVA). This treatment combines oral or topical administration of a medicine called psoralen with exposure to UVA light. UVA has a long wavelength that penetrates deeper into the skin than UVB. Psoralen makes the skin more sensitive to this light. Compared with broadband UVB treatment, PUVA treatment taken two to three times a week clears psoriasis more consistently and in fewer treatments. However, it is associated with more short-term side effects, including nausea, headache, fatigue, burning, and itching. Care must be taken to avoid sunlight after ingesting psoralen to avoid severe sunburns, and the eyes must be protected with UVA-absorbing glasses. Long-term treatment is associated with an increased risk of squamous-cell and, possibly, melanoma skin cancers.

Systemic Treatment

For more severe forms of psoriasis, doctors sometimes prescribe medicines that are taken internally by pill or injection. This is called systemic treatment.

  • Methotrexate. Like cyclosporine, methotrexate slows cell turnover by suppressing the immune system. It can be taken by pill or injection. Patients taking methotrexate must be closely monitored because it can cause liver damage and/or decrease the production of oxygen-carrying red blood cells, infection-fighting white blood cells, and clot-enhancing platelets. As a precaution, doctors do not prescribe the drug for people who have had liver disease or anemia (an illness characterized by weakness or tiredness due to a reduction in the number or volume of red blood cells that carry oxygen to the tissues). Methotrexate should not be used by pregnant women, or by women who are planning to get pregnant, because it may cause birth defects. Retinoids. Oral retinoids are compounds with vitamin A-like properties that may be prescribed for severe cases of psoriasis that do not respond to other therapies. Because these medications also may cause birth defects, women must protect themselves from pregnancy.
  • Cyclosporine. Taken orally, cyclosporine acts by suppressing the immune system to slow the rapid turnover of skin cells. It may provide quick relief of symptoms, but the improvement stops when treatment is discontinued. Its rapid onset of action is helpful in avoiding hospitalization of patients whose psoriasis is rapidly progressing. Cyclosporine may impair kidney function or cause high blood pressure (hypertension). Therefore, patients must be carefully monitored by a doctor. Also, cyclosporine is not recommended for patients who have a weak immune system or those who have had skin cancers as a result of PUVA treatments in the past.
  • Biologic response modifiers. Biologics are made from proteins produced by living cells instead of chemicals. They interfere with specific immune system processes which cause the overproduction of skin cells and inflammation. These drugs are injected (sometimes by the patient). Patients taking these treatments need to be monitored carefully by a doctor. Because these drugs suppress the immune system response, patients taking these drugs have an increased risk of infection, and the drugs may also interfere with patients taking vaccines. Also, some of these drugs have been associated with other diseases (like central nervous system disorders, blood diseases, cancer, and lymphoma) although their role in the development of or contribution to these diseases is not yet understood. Some are approved for adults only, and their effects on pregnant or nursing women are not known.
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Chinese Medicine

Chinese medicine is rooted in philosophies dating back thousands of years.Chinese treatment theory, we should treat the psoriasis start from the internal organs and blood, finally the skin problem will disappear. And the medicine should choose the safe and long term herb medicine. The treatment is to adjust your immune system and based on your own condition.

360°Removing Toxin Treatments to Cure Psoriasis

The therapy though a 360°high-energy nm tank to strongly dissolve and ablate the toxic proteases adsorbed in the blood vessel wall and the blood poisoning group in the blood cells.The 03 will be applied in the treatments to purify the blood and excrete the toxin from human body, which reach a purpose of detoxification from the source. To cure psoriasis from the disease sources, preventing the reoccurrence of it.

The traditional blood detoxification treatments only purify the toxin in the blood and internal organs to expel them form body, but the stubborn toxin in the blood vessel wall and the deep parts of internal organs still in there which led the residual of toxin in body, so that the disease will occur reoccurrence with the blood circulation.

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